Thursday, October 1, 2009

The National Trust: You Tube Channel

This is cool. Thanks to twitter, I found out that The National Trust has a You Tube channel: The National Trust charity's Channel The latest video: Learn how to make a seasonal fruit crumble with the National Trust's chef Richard. You can follow The National Trust on Twitter: http://twitter.com/nationaltrust And here's another interesting tidbit of news about The National Trust: New Monopoly set gives everyone the chance to own a stately pile The National Trust has launched its very own Monopoly set – becoming the first ever charity version of the game to be created - on sale from Thursday 1 October.

7 comments:

  1. The National Trust is one of those charities that I'm always in two minds about. It does plenty of good work but I have, on occasion, heard some rather surprising stories about it!
    That said I have to give it credit was using Twitter and You Tube as it does, and for launching its own version of Monopoly. xx

    ReplyDelete
  2. Now you have me very curious, Flighty. I'd love to know what stories you've heard about The National Trust! (you can always send me an email)

    Yes, indeed, good for them for using Twitter and YouTube and launching their own version of Monopoly.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Let's just say that it was less than charitable on occasion! I was told the stories a long time ago so maybe things are better now.
    However although it's a charity it is also a very big business organisation so I don't think that we should be surprised at what it does at times! xx

    ReplyDelete
  4. You're right, Flighty - it is a big business organisation. It's still a shame though that any charity would behave badly.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I visited Blickling Hall in Norfolk recently and I cam eaway from it wondering if I won the EuroLottery would the National Trust sell it to me? I wonder if its on the monopoly board--that could be my answer instead!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm an NT member, too. One of my reservations about them, though, is that it's like giving property to the Church in the Middle Ages - it's then locked away for good.

    ReplyDelete